The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma

About the Book
This book takes on what are considered “unconventional” and holistic approaches to deal with all kinds of trauma – victims of rape, victims of war, the Holocaust, bomb blasts, accidents, domestic violence and the list goes on . It discussed in detai how the manifestations of trauma affect the human body in addition to the already well-documented psychological manifestations.

It is not a self-help book. The book is for doctors, for psychotherapists, social workers and other mental health related professionals. Now the book takes you through the socioeconomics of trauma, which means how much money is made from pushing for medications alone rather than a more inclusive model to deal with the entire phenomena of trauma. It then discussed the neuroscience of trauma followed by theories of attachment, attunement, abuse and neglect. The author speaks at length about memory and the complications that arise from trauma imprints. He goes on to discuss the many pathways to recovery, highlighting the role of somatic therapies and somewhat criticising cognitive and behavioural approaches in this case. Van der Kolk gives you detailed references for all of his ground-breaking claims detailing therapeutic modalities such as eye movement desensitisation research, yoga, self-discovery, journaling in order to access our inner world of feelings, art, music and dance – wherever language has failed to help – which it has in trauma.
Read time : 28-30 hours approximately
Star Rating : 3 out of 5 stars
Book publication Date : 2015 (English)
Publisher : Penguin Books
Book Review : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5KxJ5vpfrOk

About the Book
This book takes on what are considered “unconventional” and holistic approaches to deal with all kinds of trauma – victims of rape, victims of war, the Holocaust, bomb blasts, accidents, domestic violence and the list goes on . It discussed in detai how the manifestations of trauma affect the human body in addition to the already well-documented psychological manifestations.

It is not a self-help book. The book is for doctors, for psychotherapists, social workers and other mental health related professionals. Now the book takes you through the socioeconomics of trauma, which means how much money is made from pushing for medications alone rather than a more inclusive model to deal with the entire phenomena of trauma. It then discussed the neuroscience of trauma followed by theories of attachment, attunement, abuse and neglect. The author speaks at length about memory and the complications that arise from trauma imprints. He goes on to discuss the many pathways to recovery, highlighting the role of somatic therapies and somewhat criticising cognitive and behavioural approaches in this case. Van der Kolk gives you detailed references for all of his ground-breaking claims detailing therapeutic modalities such as eye movement desensitisation research, yoga, self-discovery, journaling in order to access our inner world of feelings, art, music and dance – wherever language has failed to help – which it has in trauma.
Read time : 28-30 hours approximately
Star Rating : 3 out of 5 stars
Book publication Date : 2015 (English)
Publisher : Penguin Books
Book Review : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5KxJ5vpfrOk

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by Bessel van der Kolk, MD

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