Reflective practice and professional development in psychotherapy

About the Book
This 300+ page book is the only Indian writing that addresses in such detail mindful attention or reflection as a medium to scaffold the Indian therapists learnings in their therapeutic work. The authors clearly delineate the process of reflection, with toolkits to boot, and highlight cultural contexts. This is so important because we know that cultures shape us. While we are well aware of “experiential niches,” most Indian psychology departments teach using textbooks from the West that neglect specific rules, scripts and goals contributing to our Indianness – that which influences our emotional, motivational, and learning experiences. While our profession studies human suffering, our textbooks omit physical and social settings, historically constituted customs and practices, ethnotheories and socioeconomics. This book addresses this gap and see’s India as a “whole” and a sum of its parts (It is inclusive, not exclusive). It helps you understand YOU as an Indian therapist, your Indian client, and the therapeutic alliance embedded within this context.

Book Review : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5L49WIoETU

About the Book
This 300+ page book is the only Indian writing that addresses in such detail mindful attention or reflection as a medium to scaffold the Indian therapists learnings in their therapeutic work. The authors clearly delineate the process of reflection, with toolkits to boot, and highlight cultural contexts. This is so important because we know that cultures shape us. While we are well aware of “experiential niches,” most Indian psychology departments teach using textbooks from the West that neglect specific rules, scripts and goals contributing to our Indianness – that which influences our emotional, motivational, and learning experiences. While our profession studies human suffering, our textbooks omit physical and social settings, historically constituted customs and practices, ethnotheories and socioeconomics. This book addresses this gap and see’s India as a “whole” and a sum of its parts (It is inclusive, not exclusive). It helps you understand YOU as an Indian therapist, your Indian client, and the therapeutic alliance embedded within this context.

Book Review : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5L49WIoETU

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by Poornima Bhola, Chetna Duggal & Rathna Isaac (2022)

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